Thankfulness

We think that we can remember the things that happen to us day after day, year after year. But, the truth is that we can’t, not really. So we tell ourselves a story to fill in the blanks around the bits and pieces we do remember. After we retell it a few dozen times all that’s left is the story.

We change our memory of real experiences to fit the story we want to tell.

For years I told myself a story about how hard my life was. I’d spin my story to meet an unhealthy need to feel sorry for myself. I’m over it now, but way back when, I’d try to convince whoever would listen that my life was miserable and they should feel sorry for me too. We’ve all tried to pretend that things are more extreme, desperate, and harder than they are.

Why would anyone do that? Because we can’t really remember how great we’ve got it.

Today, I tell the story of a man who knows how to be thankful despite the natural human urge to complain.

Most everyday I get out of bed and start thinking about what I need to get done. I try to imagine all of the tasks that need to get completed and get a sense what kind of day it’s going to be.

But every once in a while I get a super clear perspective of the life that I’m living and everything comes into focus. When that happens I get overwhelmed with humility and thanksgiving.

I am truly blessed.

I asked my best friend to marry me and she said yes.

Six years later we have two cute kids and we love them like crazy.

We live in a city that was practically designed for young families with one of the nation’s best school districts.

We never worry about money or bills.

We can see the snow capped Sierra Nevada mountains from the house.

My commute to the office is 7 minutes.

This Thanksgiving I intend to be more present in the moment, more attentive to my family, and more thankful for my many blessings. My cup truly runneth over.

What are you thankful for?